Unfair: outlet sale The New Science of Criminal online Injustice outlet sale

Unfair: outlet sale The New Science of Criminal online Injustice outlet sale

Unfair: outlet sale The New Science of Criminal online Injustice outlet sale

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “Unfair succinctly and persuasively recounts cutting-edge research testifying to the faulty and inaccurate procedures that underpin virtually all aspects of our criminal justice system, illustrating many with case studies.”—The Boston Globe
 

A child is gunned down by a police officer; an investigator ignores critical clues in a case; an innocent man confesses to a crime he did not commit; a jury acquits a killer. The evidence is all around us: Our system of justice is fundamentally broken.
 
But it’s not for the reasons we tend to think, as law professor Adam Benforado argues in this eye-opening, galvanizing book. Even if the system operated exactly as it was designed to, we would still end up with wrongful convictions, trampled rights, and unequal treatment. This is because the roots of injustice lie not inside the dark hearts of racist police officers or dishonest prosecutors, but within the minds of each and every one of us.
 
This is difficult to accept. Our nation is founded on the idea that the law is impartial, that legal cases are won or lost on the basis of evidence, careful reasoning and nuanced argument. But they may, in fact, turn on the camera angle of a defendant’s taped confession, the number of photos in a mug shot book, or a simple word choice during a cross-examination. In Unfair, Benforado shines a light on this troubling new field of research, showing, for example, that people with certain facial features receive longer sentences and that judges are far more likely to grant parole first thing in the morning.
 
Over the last two decades, psychologists and neuroscientists have uncovered many cognitive forces that operate beyond our conscious awareness. Until we address these hidden biases head-on, Benforado argues, the social inequality we see now will only widen, as powerful players and institutions find ways to exploit the weaknesses of our legal system. 
 
Weaving together historical examples, scientific studies, and compelling court cases—from the border collie put on trial in Kentucky to the five teenagers who falsely confessed in the Central Park Jogger case—Benforado shows how our judicial processes fail to uphold our values and protect society’s weakest members. With clarity and passion, he lays out the scope of the legal system’s dysfunction and proposes a wealth of practical reforms that could prevent injustice and help us achieve true fairness and equality before the law.

Review

Winner of the 2017 American Psychology-Law Society Book Award
Greater Good Favorite Book of 2015
A Goodreads Best Book of the Month
A 2016 Media for a Just Society Awards Finalist
A 20th Annual Books for a Better Life Awards Finalist
A 2016 NASW Science in Society Journalism Award, Honorable Mention
A 2015 Green Bag Exemplary Legal Writing Honoree


"In this important, deeply researched debut, [Benforado] draws on findings from psychology and neuroscience to show that police, jurors, and judges are generally guided by intuitive feelings rather than hard facts in making assessments...The new research challenges basic assumptions about most key aspects of the legal system, including eyewitness memory, jury deliberations, police procedures, and punishment...An original and provocative argument that upends our most cherished beliefs about providing equal justice under the law."
Kirkus Reviews, starred

"This book suggests that criminal justice in the United States is not a system at all but a set of dysfunctional units that deliver biased decisions that make society less safe. Benforado deftly analyzes actual cases and recent studies in psychology and neuroscience to argue for broad-based reforms...A stimulating critique of today''s criminal justice system with applications to recent cases in Ferguson, MO, and elsewhere...Authoritative and accessible."
—Library Journal, starred

"...a well-documented eye-opener."
—San Francisco Book Review 

" Unfair succinctly and persuasively recounts cutting-edge research testifying to the faulty and inaccurate procedures that underpin virtually all aspects of our criminal justice system, illustrating many with case studies."
The Boston Globe

"In  Unfair, [Benforado] argues that most errors in criminal justice stem from the failure to take into account the frailties of human cognition, memory and decision-making…this is a book everyone in the legal profession should read, and the rest of us too, for it is as much about the confounding idiosyncrasies of everyday behaviour as inequity in law." 
—New Scientist

“Benforado makes a compelling case, backed with reference to extensive scientific research, for [his] point of view in Unfair… Over and over again, Benforado demonstrates that basic assumptions underlying the criminal justice system are not supported by scientific evidence… [He] also reminds us of how far the practice of criminal justice has drifted from its ostensible goals… He is hopeful, however, that the system can be reformed, and the information in this book is offered in part toward that end. Unfair offers an excellent overview of an important body of information.”
—PopMatters

“Benforado is part of a rising chorus of academics, politicians, and those of us who work in the criminal justice system who are appalled by the fact that this country spends $60 billion a year on prisons and boasts the dubious honor of incarcerating more persons per capita than any other nation. In Unfair, Benforado does a wonderful job of describing the scope of the problem and of thinking creatively about how we can improve our criminal justice system.”
—The Federal Lawyer

“Insightful… one of the most important books written in a very long time.”
Douglas Blackmon, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Slavery by Another Name; American Forum

"Benforado''s book is simply chock-full of eye-opening research and practical suggestions for improvement... Hopefully, [ Unfair] will push us to take a step in [the right] direction."
Greater Good

"No one denies that the criminal justice system should be based on reason and respect for our fellow humans, but Unfair compellingly insists that to do that will require accepting some uncomfortable truths. Every lawyer and judge working in the criminal justice system should read this book. Those who take it seriously will sleep uneasily for quite some time."
JOTWELL

"As gripping as a Grisham novel, only it isn''t fiction. With captivating cases and razor-sharp science, Adam Benforado puts the justice system on trial and makes a bulletproof argument that it''s fundamentally broken. This extraordinary book is a must-read for every judge, lawyer, detective, and concerned citizen in America."
—Adam Grant, Wharton School of Business, and author of Give and Take 

"In Unfair, Adam Benforado makes us aware of all our many imperfections when it comes to the judgment of others in our midst. He does so gently and with astonishing knowledge. Learning so much about our subconscious biases and the judicial system that exploits them is fascinating--and deeply troubling. But he goes further: he offers obtainable solutions, ones that we should race to effect, both within our own minds and in the human fates on which we bring our minds to bear."
—Jeff Hobbs, author of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace

"Adam Benforado has written a book that will make you rethink everything you believe about crime and punishment. He gracefully blends science and storytelling to make a powerful case that our failure to bring the realities of human psychology into the courtroom has led to profound injustice. Enthralling and unsettling in equal measure, Unfair might be the most important book you read this year."
—Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive

"This thoughtful and penetrating study raises many deeply troubling questions, and even more important, offers humane and very reasonable approaches to cure some of the ills of a system of ''criminal injustice'' that should not be tolerated."
Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus, MIT

"Systems of justice are built by human brains. As such, they''re subject to all the foibles of human psychology, from biased decision-making to xenophobia to false memories. With the eye of a scholar and the ear of a storyteller, Benforado marshals the burgeoning research to illuminate the nexus between law and the mind sciences."
—David Eagleman, Director of the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law, and author of Incognito

" Unfair is beautifully written, painstakingly researched, profoundly illuminating, and deeply disturbing. As evidence mounts that our criminal ''justice'' system abounds with injustices, Benforado lays bare the systemic and psychological sources of its failures, weaving together compelling narrative and recent insights from the mind sciences. Unfair is must reading for anyone who cares about justice and, more important, for anyone who does not."
—Jon Hanson, Alfred Smart Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director of the Project on Law and Mind Sciences and the Systemic Justice Project

" Unfair is a beautifully written book that manages to be both engrossing and important--a fascinating blend of psychological insight, legal know-how, and compelling storytelling. If you''ve ever wondered why the legal system doesn''t work as well as it should, Benforado''s intelligent take on the relationship between human psychology and the law will enlighten you--and leave you hopeful that we''re capable of doing better."
—Adam Alter, NYU Stern School of Business, and author of Drunk Tank Pink 

" Unfair is an engaging, eye-opening read. By weaving together the latest findings in psychology and neuroscience with real-world stories of justice gone wrong, Unfair sheds new light on how easy it is for unconscious biases to wreak havoc on the criminal justice system and the steps that can be taken to make the system fairer."
—Sian Beilock, University of Chicago Professor of Psychology, and author of Choke and How the Body Knows Its Mind

" Unfair is an incisive look at the problems that arise in the legal system because of the way people think as well as the prospects for meaningful reform. Adam Benforado has written an engaging and masterful book on one of the most important issues society has to face."
Art Markman, Professor of Psychology, University of Texas, author of Smart Thinking and Smart Change

"In this provocative critique of the American criminal justice system, Adam Benforado demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that unfair outcomes aren''t tragic exceptions--they''re the rule, and human psychology is to blame. Bringing together cutting-edge research with insights from real life cases, Benforado shows us how our hidden biases undermine our guarantee of fairness and equality under the law, and offers much-needed solutions."
Philip Zimbardo, author of The Lucifer Effect 

"It''s surprisingly easy to look back at high-profile criminal proceedings and see the flaws, while taking the overall system for granted. Adam Benforado looks across the whole canvas, elucidating through empirical data and scientific research how our own legal structures measure up--or, more accurately, don''t--to our values of justice and fairness. Criminal law in the United States is far from perfect, and Benforado''s thorough, thought-provoking examination is a welcome step in identifying and preventing institutionalized injustice."
Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor in Law, Harvard Law School

"In this fascinating book, Adam Benforado sheds new light from just about every angle on our criminal justice system. Practitioners, policy makers and everyday citizens will learn much about a subject that demands greater public debate."
Tom Perriello, former Representative, United States Congress

"Unlike fields such as economics or philosophy, judicial theory and practice has largely ignored relevant findings about the human mind coming out of behavioral neuroscience and social psychology. This timely and important book can help us bring our criminal justice system into the 21st Century."
Edward Slingerland, Co-director of the Centre for the Study of Human Evolution, Cognition and Culture and author of Trying Not to Try 

"An admirable collection of compelling stories about what is wrong with the criminal justice system.”
—Christian Century
 

About the Author

Adam Benforado is an associate professor of law at Drexel University. A graduate of Yale College and Harvard Law School, he served as a federal appellate law clerk and an attorney at Jenner & Block. He has published numerous scholarly articles, and his op-eds and essays have appeared in a variety of publications including the Washington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and Legal Times. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and daughter.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Book Shark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic! A Science-Based Look at Our Criminal System
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2015
Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice by Adam Benforado “Unfair" is a fantastic, well-researched look at what is at the heart of our unfair criminal system. Law professor Adam Benforado has provided the public with an eye-opening gem grounded on the... See more
Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice by Adam Benforado

“Unfair" is a fantastic, well-researched look at what is at the heart of our unfair criminal system. Law professor Adam Benforado has provided the public with an eye-opening gem grounded on the best current science, historical court cases and insightful research. He explores the nature of the criminal mind, eyewitness memory, jury deliberations, police procedures, and intuitions about punishment. This enlightening 402-page book includes twelve chapters broken out into the following four parts: I. Investigation, II. Adjudication, III. Punishment, and IV. Reform.

Positives:
1. A well written, well-researched book that is grounded on sound logic and good science.
2. A fascinating topic, the new science of our unfair criminal justice system.
3. Mastery of a complex topic and innate ability to educate and enlighten at an accessible level.
4. I love the tone and pace of this book. Benforado is very careful not to oversell the benefits of science while at the same time clearly showing what good research has uncovered and the shortcomings of our system. Kudos!
5. A clearly defined theme, “Injustice is built into our legal structures and influences outcomes every minute of every day. And its origins lie not inside the dark heart of a bigoted police officer or a scheming D.A. but within the mind of each and every one of us.” Intriguing.
6. Provides many interesting cases and immerses sound logic and science into each one. David Rosenbaum’s story illustrates an unacceptable chain of mistakes. “The physical disgust they felt may have generated an explanation for David’s condition that involved lack of discipline and poor character—drunkenness—rather than another potential cause: a stroke, seizure, diabetes, head injury, or drug interaction. And once the ETOH label was attached, David was in trouble.”
7. Confirmation bias and its impact to our criminal system. “Once David was labeled a drunk, the responders and medical professionals appeared to focus on finding evidence that supported that description.”
8. A fascinating look at false confessions and what leads to them. “False confessions and incriminating statements are the leading contributors to wrongful homicide convictions, present in over 60 percent of the known DNA murder-exoneration cases in the United States. More broadly, they appear to have been a factor in about 25 percent of all post-conviction exonerations.”
9. Great use of neuroscience. “Some scientists have claimed that roughly half of the variability in antisocial traits across the population comes down to the genes that people are born with. All things being equal, if you have a Y chromosome, you are several times more likely to engage in violent criminal behavior. And psychopaths and pedophiles are both disproportionately men. But it can be hard to separate out the impact of genes from social factors: after all, men and women are subjected to very different arrays of experiences and expectations.”
10. A look at how lawyers break the rules and what can be done about it. “We should worry, then, about the enormous control that prosecutors have over the state’s evidence and witnesses: they are the ones who decide if and when the defendant’s team will receive the ballistics report or the DNA report or a copy of the witness statement or the initial police write-up.” “Research suggests that the more prosecutors are focused on winning, rather than on achieving justice, the more likely they will be to act dishonestly.”
11. The role of juries. “Of course, the faith we have in our own perceptions and our cynical discrediting of those with whom we disagree can create trouble even when a jury does get to consider the case. As jurors, we are often oblivious to how our own preexisting commitments, beliefs, and biases shape our impressions, but we quickly and easily spot them influencing others.”
12. Surprising findings and tidbits used throughout the book. “Recent research suggests that a person’s weight can influence juror assessments, with male jurors more likely to reach a guilty verdict when the accused is an overweight woman than when she is thin.”
13. So how reliable is our memory? “There is, for instance, compelling evidence that eyewitness identifications are frequently inaccurate. When the actual perpetrator appears in a lineup along with several innocent fillers, witnesses fail to pick anyone out about a third of the time.”
14. The impact of race. “Research suggests that people are 50 percent more likely to make an error in identifying a person from another race, although individuals who have a lot of contact with the other race tend to be more accurate.”
15. Great stuff on separating truth from untruth. “Overall, it turns out that we are quite bad at ferreting out deception. In a recent analysis of more than two hundred studies, participants were able to identify lies and truths correctly just 54 percent of the time, only marginally better than chance.”
16. An excellent chapter on judging. “Although she was forced to retreat from her statements about how gender and ethnicity influence judging, Justice Sotomayor was right: identities and personal experiences do “affect the facts that judges choose to see.”
17. So what drives us to punish? “Indeed, there is a growing scientific consensus that it is a desire for retribution—not deterrence or incapacitation—that has the strongest influence on why we punish.”
18. A look at prison life. Ugly facts. “A country that abolished slavery 150 years ago now has a greater number of black men in the correctional system than there were slaves in 1850 and a greater percentage of its black population in jail than was imprisoned in apartheid South Africa. Black, male, and no high school diploma? It’s more likely than not that you will spend time in prison during your life.”
19. Compelling arguments on what we can do to improve our society. “The starting point of any reform comes in understanding and accepting this reality. We all need to look at the criminal justice system through new eyes. So, raising awareness about psychology and neuroscience research is critical.”
20. Notes and a formal bibliography included.

Negatives:
1. I have one main negative, the lack of links to notes. A real shame since I’m one of those readers who loves to dig deeper into the references. That being said, I’ve read and reviewed a number of books that makes references to such research and Benforado is on point.
2. Charts and diagrams would have complemented this excellent narrative.

In summary, I absolutely loved this book! It has two of my favorite subjects fused into one, where science meets our criminal system and all that it implies. Benforado won me over with his mastery of this fascinating topic, great pacing, and excellent insights and dare I say judicial use of the best of our current science. It’s been a while since I’ve read a book this good, kudos. I can’t recommend this book enough.

Further recommendations: “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander, “Uncertain Justice” by Laurence Tribe, “Thinking Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman, “The Nine” By Jeffrey Toobin, “The Roberts Court” by Marcia Coyle, “Braintrust” by Patricia Churchland, “The Blank Slate” and “Better Angels of Our Nature” by Steven Pinker, “The Believing Brain” by Michael Shermer, “Subliminal” by Leonard Mlodinow, “We Are Our Brains” by D.F. Swaab, and “Are You Sure?” by Ginger Campbell.
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Bradley Bevers
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Book That Actually Says Something - 5 Stars, Highly Recommended
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2016
Simply put, one of the best non-fiction books I have read in a long time. The author has put together a fascinating book on crime, the legal actors involved, and the problems that result. As a layman, I thought that tone and pacing were near perfect and most of the material... See more
Simply put, one of the best non-fiction books I have read in a long time. The author has put together a fascinating book on crime, the legal actors involved, and the problems that result. As a layman, I thought that tone and pacing were near perfect and most of the material was new to me. It seems many of the applied psychology books that come out are interesting and insightful, but rarely actually say anything. This book is different - the author has an agenda and is not afraid to push it. While I don''t agree with all of his conclusions and some of his recommendations seem too far-fetched, it is refreshing to read a book that actually has something to say.

Here are a few of the more interesting points the author makes:

* Eyewitness testimony, and human memory, is flawed
* False confessions are not only possible but common. Scary statistics (60% of DNA exonerations involved false or incriminating confessions).
* Why prisons don''t work very well
* How everyone is biased, and what we can do about it
* How to make the court system more fair, including some radical ideas (virtual courtrooms for example)
* Damning evidence on the true unfairness of the system and who its tilted towards

With a book that is willing to jump into the fray so completely, there were some points that I disagreed with as well. The author''s proposal of a shift away from blame, the belief that there is not real evil in the world, and some of his proposals (like virtual prisons) feel like a big stretch. Regardless of what you think of those things or the other proposals made, you will be forced to think and think deeply with this book.

Highly recommended.
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Russell Krause
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought provoking.
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2015
A great trip through the new frontier of neuroscience and the implications for the criminal justice system. This book helps remind us that current approaches, although better than previous approaches, are not necessarily the pinnacle of human thought. As we learn more about... See more
A great trip through the new frontier of neuroscience and the implications for the criminal justice system. This book helps remind us that current approaches, although better than previous approaches, are not necessarily the pinnacle of human thought. As we learn more about ourselves and our decision making process, it is important to update the criminal justice process to keep pace. The book takes a few leaps that leave the reader uncomfortable (should we punish a criminal for a crime they committed due to external factors such as emotional damage from abuse in childhood?). The uncomfortable nature of those questions are exactly what''s needed to drive a meaningful debate about the source of crime, the process of justice, and the revisions which may be needed. The author''s opinions are relatively clear, but the book does a decent enough job of leaving the options up for debate rather than dictating any specific plan. It will push the reader into areas where they disagree with the concepts being presented, and force the reader to stop and mentally articulate (and evaluate) their reasons for disagreement. This, of course, is one of the highest purposes of books.

This book is a must-read for anyone with strong interest in the justice system, decision-making neuroscience, or both.
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A.S.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
About Cognitive Bias in Justice
Reviewed in the United States on May 8, 2021
What this book is essentially about is Cognitive Bias in Criminal Justice. I don''t think Benforado quite nails it home for a common audience, but that is essentially what is being discussed here. If you consider yourself a sufficiently critical person concerned... See more
What this book is essentially about is Cognitive Bias in Criminal Justice. I don''t think Benforado quite nails it home for a common audience, but that is essentially what is being discussed here.

If you consider yourself a sufficiently critical person concerned with (Capital J) Justice - you owe it to yourself to read the book and consider how our own minds are predisposed to prejudice by instinct, and the result is hazardous to investigative and judicial prudence.
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Zuff
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very interesting description of various problems, opinions, and issues.
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2021
Justice is not an easy issue. Even defining what justice is, is hard, and definitely, culture has a lot to do with it. If the purpose of justice is to clarify what is accepcted and what is not, or just to prevent things that are considered as bad by ther relevant... See more
Justice is not an easy issue. Even defining what justice is, is hard, and definitely, culture has a lot to do with it. If the purpose of justice is to clarify what is accepcted and what is not, or just to prevent things that are considered as bad by ther relevant authorities/cultures, then different system choose different methods, and the discussion in this book made me rethink about the justice system.
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dustylee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you want to better understand the root of some of the problems in the U.S. Justice system, read this book.
Reviewed in the United States on August 14, 2015
I highly recommend this look at the problems of the criminal justice system from unwarranted police violence to innocent persons convicted of serious crimes and prisons as a breeding ground for career criminals, all from the perspective of the social sciences, particularly... See more
I highly recommend this look at the problems of the criminal justice system from unwarranted police violence to innocent persons convicted of serious crimes and prisons as a breeding ground for career criminals, all from the perspective of the social sciences, particularly psychology. Rather than accept explanations based on the personal attributes of police, prison guards or prosecutors "gone bad" (although there are certainly examples of those), the author, a professor of law, he looks at the institutions and how they consciously or unconsciously facilitate the environment where abuses of power and errors can easily occur. For persons not familiar with it, he examines the research explaining how false confessions are given (with a greater frequency than I expected), the vulnerability to error in eye testimony evidence (which is the most frequent basis of incorrect guilt verdicts which are later overturned due to DNA evidence), and the damage to society (not just the inmate) perpetrated by prisoner "management." Most interesting, at least for me, was his look at justice system policies of other western countries that not only have relinquished the violence of the death penalty, but who actually see the goal of prison (or any criminal sentence) as REHABILITATION rather than retribution. Although we are currently far from it, he had lots of recommendations for how to decrease recidivism including changing the role of prison guard to something closer to social worker or mentor. For anyone trying to better under stand how the "smartest nation on earth" so often gets it wrong when it comes to legal justice, this is the book to read.
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Tom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Solid Reasoning
Reviewed in the United States on September 15, 2020
This book is quite thoroughly researched and takes a look at the criminal justice system through the eyes of a psychologist. Adam explains the process of our system and how certain biases can affect whether a suspect is questioned, a witness''s testimony is unknowingly... See more
This book is quite thoroughly researched and takes a look at the criminal justice system through the eyes of a psychologist. Adam explains the process of our system and how certain biases can affect whether a suspect is questioned, a witness''s testimony is unknowingly corrupted, or whether a judge acts more lenient or not. Much of these biases seem unnoticeable, like whether a suspect is tried in the morning or evening, but after studying, these factors reveal that there is much more unfairness in our justice system, as it''s much better for you to be tried in the morning than afternoon unless its after the judge had lunch. My only complaint is that Adam could''ve used more statistics to explain his reasoning so that as the reader, you can sift through which issues are worth dealing with. Overall, this book is a solid read.
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Steven A. Chase
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don''t Fail to Read this Book
Reviewed in the United States on November 21, 2015
Everyone should read this book. It should be required reading for high school civics classes, and then again in college courses where it could be discussed from a more worldly point of view. Mr. Benforado has delineated the inequities that exist in our criminal justice... See more
Everyone should read this book. It should be required reading for high school civics classes, and then again in college courses where it could be discussed from a more worldly point of view. Mr. Benforado has delineated the inequities that exist in our criminal justice system. This is a system that incarcerates more people per capita than any other country in the world, including those that we consider to be totalitarian regimes. People need to know about the plight of those caught up in the machine of injustice. From false confessions to false convictions, our criminal justice system is rife with bias, prejudice, and unfairness. Some of the author''s ideas about solutions to the problems are a bit over the top, but his research and the factual scenarios set forth in this book must be seen by everyone. I have recommended this book to everyone I know. Please read it.
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Top reviews from other countries

Jamil Azad
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An organization which is sad, frightening
Reviewed in Canada on May 24, 2016
A profound, extensive and essential expose of the current criminal justice system. An organization which is sad, frightening, and mostly beyond repair but daily pokes its ugly face out of our newspapers. An accusation which is buttressed by the contemporary struggle over...See more
A profound, extensive and essential expose of the current criminal justice system. An organization which is sad, frightening, and mostly beyond repair but daily pokes its ugly face out of our newspapers. An accusation which is buttressed by the contemporary struggle over the appointment of the ninth Justice of the Supreme Court which shows that for the powers that be political advantage and not law or justice is what the courts are expected to serve.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
this was a gift
Reviewed in Canada on March 14, 2019
this was a gift
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Richard Zak
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Prof. Adam Benforado is a must-read for every policy and lawmaker in government.
Reviewed in Canada on January 4, 2021
A great reference for anyone speaking out against the injustices they see in our justice system.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in Canada on May 25, 2017
Worthwhile read
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